Collaborating Centre for the WHO-FIC in Japan

About

What is Who-FIC?

WHO-FIC stands for the WHO Family of International Classifications. It is a suite of international classifications comprised mainly of two reference classifications, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)*1 and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)*2. As shown in the diagram below, the WHO-FIC comprises the ICD, ICF, a third reference currently being developed, the International Classification of Health Interventions (ICHI), and their five related classifications and five derived classifications.

What is the WHO-FIC Network?

WHO has designated a number of Collaborating Centres to work with its Headquarters and Regional Offices in the development, dissemination, maintenance and use of the WHO Family of International Classifications. The organization of the Network is shown below, and Network members belong to both the committees and groups. Currently, the Network focuses its activities on revising ICD-10 to ICD-11. The Revision Steering Group was formed under the Update & Revision Committee and medical professionals from around the world are taking part in this multidisciplinary revision effort.
※1
ICD : International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems
The International List of Causes of Death was adopted by the International Statistical Institute in 1900. Since then, the ICD has been revised and published in a series of editions to reflect advances in health and medical science over time. ICD-10 was endorsed in May 1990 by the Forty-third World Health Assembly. It now contains about 14,000 diagnostic codes. The 11th revision of the classification is currently underway, aiming for endorsement in 2015.
※2
ICF : International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
At the World Health Assembly in 2001, WHO Member States approved the ICF. Its predecessor, the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH), adopted in 1980, underwent major revisions to become ICF. ICF is a classification of health and health-related domains classified from body, individual and societal perspectives by means of two lists: a list of body functions and structure, and a list of domains of activity and participation. Since an individual’s functioning and disability occurs in a context, the ICF also includes a list of environmental factors. Currently, it contains approximately 1,500 categories.